1. The University of Michigan has earned a top ranking on Peace Corps’ Top Volunteer-Producing Colleges and Universities

    Mark Rivett posted March 27, 2019

    Read full press release

    The University of Michigan-Ann Arbor has once again earned a top ranking of Peace Corps’ Top Volunteer-Producing Colleges and Universities. This year, the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor ranks fourth among large colleges and universities nationwide. Since 1961, the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor has sent 2,734 graduates to serve in the Peace Corps. In addition, the University of Michigan ranks second among graduate schools.

    Today, 63 of U-M’s talented undergraduate alumni and 18 U-M graduate alumni are making a difference in the lives of others and becoming global leaders by serving as Peace Corps Volunteers. They are applying the skills and knowledge they acquired during their time at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor to bring about sustainable change in communities across the globe.


  2. University of Michigan Faculty Expertise and Opinions Sought After in Washington, DC

    Mark Rivett posted March 26, 2019

    Since the start of the 116th Congress, the University of Michigan’s Washington, D.C. office has supported six U-M faculty members testifying before the House of Representatives and Senate in Washington, D.C. The topics of the testimonies included protecting the electric grid, the impact of climate change on infrastructure, election security, and more. Members of Congress from Michigan, as well as nationwide, recognize the value of having University of Michigan experts in the room when making important legislative decisions and debating pressing national issues. Further information about the professors and their testimonies are below:

    Matthew Shapiro, the Lawrence R. Klein Collegiate Professor of Economics at U-M, before the U.S. House Committee on Small Business about the potential impact the recent partial government shutdown had on small businesses. Read more about his testimony here.

    Tom Lyon, professor of business economics and public policy and of environment and sustainability testified before the U.S. House Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure about ways he believes infrastructure improvement, as well as the free market, can help lessen the impacts of climate change. Read more about his testimony here.

    J. Alex Halderman, professor of electrical engineering and computer science, testified before the House Appropriations Committee Subcommittee on Financial Service and General Government, urging lawmakers to approve additional funding for election cybersecurity prior to the upcoming 2020 elections. Read more about his testimony here.

    Justin Kasper, an associate professor of climate and space sciences and engineering, testified before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs in March about how best to protect the country’s power grid from space weather. Read more about his testimony here.

    Adam FinkelAdam Finkel, clinical professor of environmental heal sciences, testified before the House Energy and Commerce Committee Subcommittee on the Environment and Climate Change, addressing the need for the Environmental Protection Agency to better protect workers from harmful chemicals and work closer with the Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Read his testimony here.

    Jeremy Kress, assistant professor of business law, testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs about proposals to de-emphasize or eliminate the designation for “systemically important non-bank financial institutions,” such as insurance and mortgage companies. He warned that such a move would be misguided and could open up the financial system to the kinds of problems that roiled the economy in 2008. Read more about his testimony here.


  3. Professor Justin Kasper addresses Senate committee on solar threat to power grid.

    Mark Rivett posted February 27, 2019

    Solar storm congressional testimony: ‘The risk is real’

    Read Full Story on The Michigan Engineer New Center

    Watch Video Testimony Here

    A solar flare in 1859 engulfed Earth in a “magnetic tsunami”—spinning compasses, making the northern lights visible in the Caribbean and drawing sparks from telegraph lines that would remain inoperative for days.

    Today’s power and technology-reliant society could fare worse should a similar solar event occur, Michigan Engineering researcher Justin Kasper told U.S. senators today.

    Justin C. Kasper

    Justin Kasper, Associate Professor Graduate advisor Program: Ph.D. in Space & Planetary Physics
    Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering

    Kasper, an associate professor of climate and space sciences and engineering, testified before the Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs and discussed how best to protect the power grid from space weather.

    “We need spacecraft closer to the sun providing earlier warning of Earth-directed events and their properties, better models of these eruptions and regional forecasts of geomagnetic disturbances,” Kasper wrote in his submitted testimony. “Most importantly, we need leadership with a mandate to coordinate and direct the research and operational components of space weather that are spread over multiple agencies.”

    Read Full Story on The Michigan Engineer New Center

    Watch Video Testimony Here


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