1. Art in the Legislature Winner: Mikaylyn Beebee

    Mark Rivett posted June 17, 2021

    The Art in the Legislature Program displays and celebrates the work of excellent student artists from Michigan’s 15 public universities each year, and their respective works are displayed in the Anderson House Office Building, or the Binsfeld Senate Building, for one year.

    State Relations Officers, university art department representatives, student-artists, their families, and the public at large are invited to attend the reception, at which time the new pieces of art will be unveiled and the students will be recognized.

    Mikaylyn Beebee

    Mikaylyn Beebee

    Mikaylyn Beebee

    “Portrait of a Necklace” is based on the fable of the crow and the serpent. The tale begins with a serpent eating a crow’s family; the crow takes vengeance by stealing the princess’ necklace and dropping it into the serpent’s lair. The royal guards then search for the necklace, find it in the lair, and gut the serpent. It’s a short story that tells that a little wit can win anything.
    Portait of a Necklace

    I was drawn to this story because I saw it as a chance to tell a narrative through portraiture, and I love the way all of these characters are connected by the necklace – it killed the serpent, adorned the princess, and allowed the crow to move on. I chose to focus and illustrate all of their relationships to the necklace by having the dead serpent around the princess’ neck, and the crow flying away, shielding her eyes with its clever venture.


  2. Art in the Legislature Winner: Jacob Yu

    Mark Rivett posted
    Wear Your Mask

    Wear Your Mask

    The Art in the Legislature Program displays and celebrates the work of excellent student artists from Michigan’s 15 public universities each year, and their respective works are displayed in the Anderson House Office Building, or the Binsfeld Senate Building, for one year.

    State Relations Officers, university art department representatives, student-artists, their families, and the public at large are invited to attend the reception, at which time the new pieces of art will be unveiled and the students will be recognized.

    Jacob Yu

    Jacob Yu

    Jacob Yu

    “Covid-19 has affected so many people, and masks became part of our daily lives. Through this work, I wanted to show how daily lives have changed through the time of pandemic. The drawing shows a commute in the year 2020. Masks are on, and the train is almost empty. Because 2020 has been a very difficult year, I wanted to capture this feeling of isolation.

  3. Art in the Legislature Winner: Kyler Alexis Luna

    Mark Rivett posted

    The Art in the Legislature Program displays and celebrates the work of excellent student artists from Michigan’s 15 public universities each year, and their respective works are displayed in the Anderson House Office Building, or the Binsfeld Senate Building, for one year.

    State Relations Officers, university art department representatives, student-artists, their families, and the public at large are invited to attend the reception, at which time the new pieces of art will be unveiled and the students will be recognized.

    Kyler Alexis Luna

    Kyler Alexis Luna

    Kyler Alexis Luna

    “Infrared” is meant to allude to something beyond skin-deep: the colors of the boy’s face are blue and yellow watercolor while the background features acrylic strokes of orange and red. Each of these colors are meant to mirror how a person looks when you view them through an infrared scanner, reinforcing the overall message that no matter the color of your skin, we all look the same underneath.
    infrared

    Infrared

    My piece is meant to shine light on the ongoing racial injustice in America faced by black Americans. As a white-Hispanic, I recognize the privilege I have with just the color of my skin. I do not have to worry about racial bias within the justice system influencing my right to a fair trial, but neither should anyone else. While this painting is one of the more prominent additions to my portfolio, the name “Infrared” alludes to something a bit more intricate: the colors of the boy’s face are blue and yellow watercolor while the background features acrylic strokes of orange and red. Each of these colors are seen when you view someone under an infrared scanner, reinforcing the overall message that no matter the color of your skin, we all look the same underneath.


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