1. Public Engagement & Impact Interview With 2019 Michigan Road Scholar Kamran Diba

    Mark Rivett posted April 25, 2019

    Read full interview at U-M Public Engagement and Impact

    One of this year’s Road Scholars is Kamran Diba, associate professor of anesthesiology and principal investigator of the Neural Circuits and Memory Lab. Diba studies neural activity in the brain related to learning, memory, and sleep. His research also has implications for aging and Alzheimer’s disease.

    In this Q&A, Kattari reveals her motivation for joining the Road Scholars, and what she hopes to learn.

    Kamran Diba

    Principal investigator of the Neural Circuits and Memory Lab at the Department of Anesthesiology in the University of Michigan Medical School

    What interested you in the Road Scholar tour?

    I first heard about Road Scholars when I was doing a Wolverine Express trip (run by the Center for Educational Outreach). One of the other participants had been a Road Scholar and recommended it as a great program.

    I’m new to the state of Michigan, having just started here at U-M in August 2017. It seems like a great way to get grounded in the state. I’m not sure whether people in Michigan feel that the faculty at U-M represents them, but I would like to work toward increasing that sense of representation. The work we do in our teaching, research, and dissemination can directly benefit the state, so I think it’s also important for me to gain a better sense of the different places, people, economics, and overall concerns in Michigan. Through the Road Scholars program we can have these interactions and two-way learning about what we all do.

    Before coming here I was at the University of Wisconsin for six years, and I regret not developing a stronger connection to that state. U-M has provided this unique opportunity to bridge that issue.
    – Kamran Diba

    The Michigan Road Scholars Tour — an annual five-day traveling seminar that takes U-M faculty through the state — increases mutual knowledge and understanding between the university and the people and communities of Michigan.

    You can keep up with the happenings on the tour May 6–10 by following #MIRoadScholars on Twitter.

    Read full interview at U-M Public Engagement and Impact


  2. Public Engagement & Impact Interview With 2019 Michigan Road Scholar Shanna Kattari

    Mark Rivett posted April 24, 2019

    Read full interview at U-M Public Engagement and Impact

    One of this year’s Road Scholars, Shanna Kattari, is an assistant professor in the School of Social Work with a courtesy appointment in Women’s Studies. She researches health disparities among transgender and nonbinary people, disability and ableism, and examines sexuality in marginalized communities, particularly in LGBTQIA individuals and people with disabilities.

    In this Q&A, Kattari reveals her motivation for joining the Road Scholars, and what she hopes to learn.

    Shanna K. Kattari, PhD, MEd, ACS; University of Michigan School of Social Work faculty, board certified sexologist, experienced sexuality educator, and social justice advocate.

    What interested you in the Road Scholar tour?

    As someone relatively new to Michigan — I’m just finishing up my second year at U-M — it’s really important to me to learn about my new state and all of the different facets that make up Michigan. I do community-based research and it is incredibly difficult to know what type of research is needed when I don’t know much about the communities in my new home, and what their needs are. Plus, I haven’t been further north than Lansing and really wanted to get to see more of the state.
    – Shanna Kattari

    The Michigan Road Scholars Tour — an annual five-day traveling seminar that takes U-M faculty through the state — increases mutual knowledge and understanding between the university and the people and communities of Michigan.

    You can keep up with the happenings on the tour May 6–10 by following #MIRoadScholars on Twitter.

    Read full interview at U-M Public Engagement and Impact


  3. Play Presented by 2018 Michigan Road Scholar José Casas Examines the Flint Water Crisis

    Mark Rivett posted April 9, 2019

    Read Washington Post Article

    Read Story at U-M School of Music, Theater, and Dance

    The Flint water crisis has been the subject of several documentaries and even a network drama, but now the issue is taking center stage in a new play at the University of Michigan.

    Playwright José Casas spent nearly three years interviewing more than 80 people in order to create his new play, “Flint,” which tells the story of the water crisis through the voices of residents, activists, scientists and politicians.

    Jose Casas

    Jose Casas
    Assistant Professor of Theatre, Drama, and Playwriting

    I consider myself an issue-driven writer,” he said. “I’m very much about social justice and telling stories of communities that have been traditionally underserved or marginalized.

    José Casas was a 2018 Michigan Road Scholar.


  4. Page 1 of 11
    1 2 3 11